January 5, 2017

Around the nation: Why this health system is launching a health information exchange

Daily Briefing
  • Hawaii: Hawaii on Friday became the first state to receive partial approval for a Section 1332 wavier, which allows a state to change how  it implements the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and use ACA funding to redesign its state health care system if it meets certain requirements. Under the so-called "State Innovation" waiver—which took effect Jan. 1 and is scheduled to end Dec. 31, 2021—Hawaii no longer has to run a Small Business Health Options Program exchange or implement several related provisions under the ACA. However, CMS denied Hawaii's request to let state agencies other than the one tasked with overseeing Medicaid operate Hawaii's exchange for individual health plans (Pradhan, Politico Pro, 12/30/16 [subscription required]; Ellison, Becker's Hospital CFO, 1/3).

  • Illinois: Rush Health, a clinically integrated health network in the Chicago area, plans to launch a private health information exchange (HIE) that will let participants access and share aggregated data on patients willing to provide their information. The HIE will initially be open only to Rush members, but Brent Estes, president and CEO of Rush, said expanding HIE access to other stakeholders, such as post-acute care providers, is "on the radar." Rush decided to launch the system largely because the Chicago area currently lacks a community HIE (Durben Hirsch, Hospitals & Health Networks, 1/4).

  • Ohio: Toby Cosgrove, CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, has removed himself from the list of possible contenders for Veterans Affairs Secretary in President-elect Donald Trump's administration. According to Bloomberg, a source said Cosgrove withdrew from consideration because he could not end his commitment at Cleveland Clinic. Cosgrove—who previously withdrew his name from consideration for the role under President Obama—will still serve on a 16-member advisory panel Trump has convened for input on jobs and the economy (Modern Healthcare, 1/3; Pettypiece/Jacobs, Bloomberg, 12/31/16).

Your guide to demystify health care IT jargon

 Your guide to demystify health care IT jargon

Health care is full of acronyms and jargon—the world of health IT even more so. How does a data mart differ from an enterprise data warehouse? Do you know about FHIR? Can you describe an API?

Here, we have assembled a collection of the most frequently referenced health IT terms, including IT-related professional organizations, regulatory mandates, infrastructure components, concepts, and major IT topics. While this list is certainly not comprehensive, it defines many of the major terms to help you decode health IT jargon.

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